• Document of the Order of the Dragon.
    1. e
    2. f
  • Saint George and the Dragon, wood carving by Bernt Notke in Stockholm’s Storkyrkan.
    1. e
    2. f
  • oldbookillustrations:

Stand up and follow me.
J-J. Grandville, from Vie privée et publique des animaux (Public and Private Life of Animals), under the direction of P. J. Stahl, Paris, 1867.
(Source: archive.org)
    1. e
    2. f
  • Unattributed.
    1. e
    2. f
  • "Leviathan", by Gustav Doré.
    1. e
    2. f
  • art-and-fury:

La Cour du Dragon - Max Ernst illustration for ‘Une Semaine de Bonté’ ou Les Sept Elements, Book III
    1. e
    2. f
  • Dragon, wood engraving, 1952. Escher.
    1. e
    2. f
  • "St. George slaying the Dragon" by Raphael.
    1. e
    2. f
  • Edmund Sullivan, c. 1900.
    1. e
    2. f
  • "Fairy’s Godmother" by Vania Zouravliov.
    1. e
    2. f
  • "Thrones Hydra" by Mark Williams.
    1. e
    2. f
  • "Dragon Flight" by Doris.
    1. e
    2. f
  • "Bombing the Dragon" by Daniel M. Shih.
    1. e
    2. f
  • Embroidered Order of the Dragon emblem | after 1408.
Munich, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum
    1. e
    2. f
  • This Italian manuscript from the 15th century depicts (clockwise) a lion, leopard, rabbit, and an elephant. After the Crusades, Europe became more conscious of its neighboring continents and their inhabitants, and knowledge of the outside world flooded into Europe through trade and hearsay. An effort was made by this artist to somewhat accurately draw animals described by classical writers, as well as one that was familiar to him, but also an animal—the elephant—which is so far from what an actual elephant looks like that he must have based his sketch off of the observations of someone else. In contrast with the other three animals, the elephant is appallingly ugly and beast-like, with little attention paid to accuracy.
    1. e
    2. f